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 Kicking 101 guide by Sessh

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mbzeld



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PostSubject: Kicking 101 guide by Sessh   Sun Apr 26, 2009 11:48 am

Just a great kicking article that I found by sesshoumaru (good kick tricker )


When it comes to 'kicking' you must first understand the purpose and the design of kicks. The legs have more muscle & weight to them then the arms do, because of this, kicks tend to be slower than punches. However, they are more powerful, have greater range, and tend to be more exotic to 'make up' for how slow they can be, by being confusing and intimidating.

The key to 'great kicking' is found through the understanding of what kick(s) is being used, and what the technique is designed to do...

In taekwondo and similar arts, kicks typically begin with what's called coiling or chambering, when the leg is drawn back and cocked in a "ready" position. Then the kick is fired with an explosive movement; and is either snapped, or thrusted out at the target. The leg is then swiftly recoiled (rechambered). After that, the leg may be lowered or used for another kick.

Below, is a list of basic kicks, and how they're executed. Also there is a korean/japanese translation for the traditionalist among you...

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The Basics

Front Kick (ahp chagi/mae geri)
From a standing position, the leg is swung upward into the target, or lifted and thrust forward into the target. Depending on the method used, the striking surface may be the instep, the point of the toe, the heel, or the ball of the foot. Remember to chamber the kick first! As the leg is brought up the knee should lead until it is pointing at the target, then the kick is released.

This kick is easy to throw. It's fast and versatile. It's used as an attacking technique. The front snap kick can be thrown a number of ways for a variety of purposes. Balance is easily placed on the rear leg when you throw this. Therefore, you can easily throw a hand attacking technique afterward.


Round/Roundhouse Kick (dolryo chagi/mawashi geri)
This is basically a front kick with the hip turned over on it's side; so the kick travels across, rather than up & down. Also beginning with a chamber, the round kick is "coiled" sideways and is drawn up close to the hip (so instead of the foot pointing down towards the ground, like in a front kick; it is pointing to the side). From this position, the round kick is snapped or swung in a circular motion. The roundhouse kick is the 360 adaptation of the same move. Since the round/roundhouse utilizes more involvement with the hips, it can be an extremely powerful kick. The striking surface is generally either the instep, shin, or ball of foot. This is also known to be Chuck Norris's favorite attack!


Side Kick (yop chagi/yoko geri)
In the most popular version of the side kick, the leg is bent and drawn up close at the side (again, this is called chambering). It snaps out to the side with a thrusting motion, using the outer edge (knife-edge) or heel of the foot as a striking surface.

This has got to be a favorite of mine personally...it's great to use when a person is too close to you (just be sure that they don't hip-check you!) Also, if you use this "bad boi" when your opponent is up against a solid structure...the amount damage inflicted will be greatly amplified!

JAO's 6-step Sidekick: 1.) initial chamber, bring up the kicking leg 2.) pivot chamber, turn hips over & chamber deeper 3.) seek & destroy, aim then release the sidekick with snapping fury 4.) rechamber 5.) pivot back into the 'squared' position 6.) plant foot and motion back into fighting stance


Hook Kick (hooryo chagi/ura-mawashi geri)
The hook kick strikes with the heel from the side. It is executed similar to a side kick; however, the kick is intentionally aimed slightly off target in the direction of the kicking foot's toes. Once at full extension, the knee is bent and the foot is snapped to the side, impacting the target with the heel.


Outside Crescent Kick (bakat hooryu chagi/soto-mawashi geri)
Much like the hook kick, it is similar to an off-target front snap kick. The leg is bent like the front kick, but the knee is pointed at a target to the left or right of the true target. The energy from the snap is then redirected, whipping the leg into an arc and hitting the target from the side. This is useful for getting inside defenses and striking the side of the head or for knocking down hands to follow up with a close attack. The kick hits with the blade of the foot.


Inside Crescent Kick (bandal chagi/uchi-mawashi geri)
Similar to the Outside Crescent Kick, but the kick starts on the outside of the target and travels across to the inside. The kick hits with the instep of the foot.


Axe Kick (naeryo chagi/kakato geri)
Characterized by a "straightened" leg coming down on an opponent. The starting phase involves the foot being moved in an arc up and forward, like a crescent kick. The arc motion is stopped, and the attacking foot is brought down to strike the target from above, in imitation of an axe. The arc can be performed in either an inward or and outward fashion (outward is more attractive).

This does not require a lot of distance to throw it effectively. It is the most unique, comprehensive fighting kick in Korea.

Note: when actually hitting a target, do not 'lock' the leg!


Reverse Hook Kick (bandae hooryo chagi/gyaku ura-mawashi geri)
This kick uses the heel as the striking tool. The kicking leg comes from around the user's back and hooks in towards the target.


Reverse Roundhouse Kick (bandae dolryo chagi/gyaku mawashi geri)
This kick uses the heel as the striking tool as well. The kicking leg comes from around the user's back like the Reverse Hook Kick, but does not hook in; instead it uses more force from the hips to generate additional power.

This is a great technique for a smaller person to use against a larger opponent. This lends itself well to be followed by a succession of other kicking or punching techniques. Tremendous power is generated by the turning and kicking.

In the tricking community we commonly call this the 'hook' or 'turn hook' (...I don't know why), but it's formally known as the reverse roundhouse kick. It's a great momentum generator for spinning combos & btwist-type tricks!


Reverse/Spin Outside Crescent (dwi bakat hooryu chagi/mikazuki geri)
Like the Reverse Hook Kick, the kick comes from around the user's back; but instead of applying a hook kick, an Outside Crescent Kick is used.

This is one of the most powerful and artistic kicks. This can open an opponent up as it breaks through his defense.

This is also a great momentum builder, and 'aerial-type' tricks transition well from this technique.

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The Analysis

With the basic's in mind, now all we have to do is break-down & analyze exactly what's occuring within tricks. By looking at tricks with a 'martial arts' perspective, we can truly begin to comprehend the depth of the tricks we've created, such as:


Jacknife: a Tornado Kick, followed by a Reverse Hook or Reverse Roundhouse Kick before landing on the ground...usually applied to 1 target.

Now we must understand that within a Jacknife, the Tornado Kick can be subsituted by the 540. If you choose to "tornado" the first kick, then your hips may already be turned over (cause the standard tornado uses a round/roundhouse kick), which makes it easier to deliver the Reverse Hook or Reverse Roundhouse Kick. If you choose to "540" the first kick, your hips will still be 'squared' with the target, and getting the Reverse Hook or Reverse Roundhouse Kick out will be harder. Both, are correct; but the "tornado" version is more attractive & appears cleaner (also gives more power to the last kick), while the "540" version is more brutal (gives more power to the first kick).


Doubleleg/Dupla Armada: a Pop Hyper 360 Spin Crescent/Wheel Kick, with an Inside Crescent Kick mirroring it. Ankles and Thighs should touch, and the legs should travel together as one to make a "heavy" impact at the zenith of the kick, and a "stomping" force upon landing...usually applied to 1 target.

You want to approach this technique as a Pop Reverse Crescent landing on the kicking leg, with an Inside Crescent Kick traveling in it's shadow. The only difference in this, is that the kicks aren't chambered! This is due to the origins of the trick (Capoeira), where the particular technique contains no chamber; but instead employs a massive amount of work done by the hips to generate striking power.


Corkscrew Round: a mid-air 360 Round/Roundhouse Kick, carried up into a 180 degree flatspin by a Low-Roundhouse Kick (Standing Sweep/Dead Leg)...can be applied to 2 targets (sweeping the target in front & kicking the target in back).

Since the first target is to be swept off their feet, it is important that we 'swingthru' the target with the Low-Roundhouse Kick, clipping the opponent below the ankles. As the force of the kick continues upwards, you jump then lean back to keep uniformity with the motion of the leg that had previously kicked. As you pitch sideways, gather your arms inward and twist 360 degrees. Upon finshing the rotation deliver a Round/Roundhouse Kick to the target that was initially behind you. Since there is an 'obvious' kick in the Cork Round, it is important that you chamber that kick before sending it out. You can choose to Round Kick, which requires a "rechamber" & looks more controlled; or you can apply a Roundhouse Kick, which is more powerful, but looks more forced. Both are correct...but once again the controlled version, the Round Kick, will look more graceful; and the powerful version, the Roundhouse Kick, will look more vicious.


Etc: I can go all day on the 'martial' application of tricks, but I don't have that type of time on my hands...plus I already know! It's up to you to find a strategy on the application of these tricks!

Just remember, kicks are a long-ranged weapon for the unarmed combatant. Getting full extention on the kicks is important. Spotting the target before you kick it is important. Maintaining a fighting posture during the kicks is important (Juji I love you [no homo], but you do not want the "mauler" arms). Pointing the toes on every Hook/Crescent Kick isn't as important...but it does make the kicks look extra nice!

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Closing

Damn...I should publish this shit and charge niggas for this type of information that I've formulated; but I'm not a money-hungry asshole!

Remember, as trickzters it's important to be faithful to what tricking is, and what it started out as. Though kicks are about 1/3 of "tricking", it is also the distinguishing factor that seperates tricking from gymnastics & breakdancing. If you're going to pursue tricking sincerely, then try to kick correctly! If we don't, then some 'dickhead' will try to make "tricking" into exactly what it isn't.

Be sure to thank chibiashkj7, for asking me a question on how to improve his kicks; otherwise my ideology of kicks and tricking wouldn't even of been posted...
Last edited by sesshoumaru; May-03-06 at 06:33 AM..
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Hingo



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PostSubject: Re: Kicking 101 guide by Sessh   Sun Apr 26, 2009 11:53 am

haha nice work todd
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Kyle

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PostSubject: Re: Kicking 101 guide by Sessh   Sun Apr 26, 2009 11:56 am

lol i smell abit to much effort for a tricker Wink
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mbzeld



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PostSubject: Re: Kicking 101 guide by Sessh   Sun Apr 26, 2009 11:57 am

we trick hard this is just the break downs
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Kyle

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PostSubject: Re: Kicking 101 guide by Sessh   Sun Apr 26, 2009 11:58 am

cheers santa afro flower elephant farao affraid
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Brooke Whatnall

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PostSubject: Re: Kicking 101 guide by Sessh   Sun Apr 26, 2009 12:22 pm

Nice work Todd, looks like you have opened a dictionary as well Smile

Just one thing I changed, and that is your youtube link, this forum supports embedding for youtube videos.

Simply, when you are writing a post, or replying, you will see above the main text area an icon that portrays a green film strip. Click it and a little window pops up asking for the youtube video address, insert it and it gives you the line for an embedded youtube video.

Smile

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http://www.sportsnap.com.au/parkour for all my PK shots
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